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Summer Reading 2018

Home Page for Summer Reading 2018, including book selection guide, topic support materials, and more!

Why Choose This Book?

Barking to the Choir, CoverBarking to the Choir, by Fr. Greg Boyle, S.J. (2017)

"In a Moving example of unconditional love in difficult times, the Jesuit priest and bestselling author of Tatoos on the Heart, Gregoy Boyle, shares what three decades of working with gang members in Los Angeles has tuaght him about faith, compassion, and the enduring power of kinship."  -- from the dust jacket.

"This book is guaranteed to shake up our ideas about God and about people with a glimpse at a world defined by more compassion and fewer barriers. Gently and humorously, Barking to the Choir invites us to find kinship with one another and reconvinces us all of our own goodness."  --GoodReads

Read this book if...

  • You want to read about Catholic Social Justice in action.
  • You want insight into life after being in a gang.
  • You like many small stories of hope and redemption.
  • You like Non-Fiction

 

 

More About the Book

About the Author

About the Book

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Compassion and Kinship: Fr Gregory Boyle at TEDxConejo 2012

Hafez (Khwāja Šamsu d-Dīn Muḥammad Hāfez-e Šīrāzī)

Father Boyle quotes the  12th-century Persian Poet frequently in this book. Here are some additional resources to learn about Hafez.

About Homeboy Industries

Theme-based Questions for Any Book on the Reading List

Theme-based Guided Questions for All Books

Consider these questions as you are reading your book. Having answers to them, with quotations from the book (cite the  page number) as supporting evidence will be very helpful when it is time to discuss and assess your reading.

Before you start reading ... How do you (the reader) define "justice"?

While you read the book
  • How did your book define "justice", and what evidence could you provide to support that definition?
  • Did your own perception of justice or injustice change as you read your book, and if so, how?"

In each book one or more issues of social injustice is present (ex. Racism, Sexism, Poverty,  etc.).  Be prepared to list specific examples and events from your book. These injustices often lead to conflicts between people (person vs person) and society or cultures (person vs society).

Consider also:
  • How are the characters or people in the book affected by injustice?
  • What conflicts arise between people and the society or culture surrounding them?
  • How are the injustices connected? (if you see more than one injustice in the book)
  • How are the injustices addressed? How are the conflicts resolved?
    • How did you feel about the way the injustices were addressed and/or the conflicts resolved?
    • Would you suggest another way to address the injustices or resolve the conflicts?
Consider also:
  • are they the main characters of the story, other people, both?
  • are they those who have suffered injustice? Direct witnesses of injustice? Well-meaning outsiders?
  • What finally inspires them to action?  What obstacles stand in their way?
  • What conflicts do those who take action face?
Consider also:
  • Are they large actions, small actions? Local? National? International?
  • How do they attempt to address or make changes to the injustice?
  • How are those actions received? Do they generate any conflicts?
  • What is their impact on culture or society?
  • What challenges are faced in taking action?

Similar Books in our Library

Tattoos on the Heart

G-Dog and the Homeboys

Father Greg Boyle and the Gangs of East Los Angeles

G-DOG [DVD]

Describes Father Greg Boyle's work with the gang members of East Los Angeles, discussing how the priest has helped young men and women start their lives over, and exploring why some former gang members are able to make a new life for themselves while others are not

Start Where You Are, but Don't Stay There

Start Where You Are, But Don't Stay There addresses a crucial issue in teacher training and professional education: the need to prepare preservice and inservice teachers for the racially diverse student populations in their classrooms. The book centers on case studies that exemplify the challenges, pitfalls, and opportunities facing teachers in diverse classrooms. These case studies of white and African American teachers working (and preparing to work) in urban and suburban settings are presented amid more general discussions about race and teaching in contemporary schools. Informing these discussions and the cases themselves is their persistent attention to opportunity gaps that need to be fully grasped by teachers who aim to understand and promote the success of students of greatly varying backgrounds.

Writing My Wrongs

an unforgettable tale of forgiveness and hope, one that reminds us that our worst deeds don't define who we are or what we can contribute to the world. And it's a lasting testament to the power of compassion, prayer, and unconditional love, for reaching those whom society has forgotten"--

The Big Book of Restorative Justice

Surviving Justice

Gale - Opposing Viewpoints

Topic Pages from GALE Opposing Viewpoints in Context & Global Issues in Context

The following issues are among those that are evident in this book.  Each term below links to a topic page on GALE Opposing Viewpoints in Context or Global Issues in Context, which are databases that contain: viewpoint essays; newspaper, magazine, and academic journal articles; reference sources;  primary source documents; and more.

Passwords for Off-Campus GALE Database use are available on Canvas.