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Summer Reading 2019

Resources for Summer Reading books for the Summer of 2019

Summer Reading List 2019

All-School Summer Reading List, 2019

"Windows"

ALL SCHOOL SUMMER READING CHOICES

ADDITIONAL HONORS/AP REQUIRED READING

Every single student, regardless of grade or track, chooses and reads one of these books.

Honors/AP students ALSO read the book below that corresponds to their course. Honors/AP Students read a total of 2 books.

Fresh Ink,  ed. Lamar Giles

 

Our Stories, Our Voices, ed. Amy Reed

 

Voces Sin Fronteras/ Our Stories, Our Truths, by authors from the Latin American Youth Center

 

Black Enough, ed. Ibi Zoboi

 

Unbroken: 13 Stories of Disabled Teens, ed. Marieke Nijkamp

 

You’re Welcome, Universe, by Whitney Gardner

Honors I (9th):

The Book Thiefby Markus Zusak

 

Honors II (10th):

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood,

or

It's Trevor Noah: Born a Crime (Adapted for Young Readers)by Trevor Noah.

 

Honors III (11th):

The Age of Innocenceby Edith Wharton

 

AP (12th):

The Handmaid's Taleby Margaret Atwood

 

Hypothetical Examples:

  • Nina Ninthgrader is entering English I (9th grade),  she chooses to read:  Fresh Ink from the list. Yay!
  • Norman Nines is entering Honors English I (9th grade), he chooses to read: Black Enough from the list, AND WILL ALSO READ The Book Thief.
  • Terry Twelvsies is entering English IV (12th grade), they choose to read: Our Stories, Our Voices from the list.  Done.
  • Torquil Twelvingham is entering AP English (12th grade), he chooses to read: Voces Sin Fronteras from the list, AND WILL ALSO READ The Handmaid's Tale.
  • Eamonn Elevensie, and Tamika Tenners use pattern-recognition and knowledge of their schedules to choose books from the list, and also read required books as necessary if they are in Honors.

For each book on the list, we have prepared a short guide that includes background material, context as to why the book is relevant, resources to go deeper, and questions to think about to help guide your reading, as well as links to places to find a copy of the book.  You can find those links in the left-hand column of this page.

When we return to school in the fall, we will engage in classroom activities that will be based on the Guiding Questions found below.

About Windows and Mirrors

"Windows" and "Mirrors"

Reading Without Walls Challenge

A Challenge issued by Gene Luen Yang in his capacity as the 2016 National Ambassador of Young People's Literature.

1. Read a book about a character who doesn’t look like you or live like you.

2. Read a book about a topic you don’t know much about.

3. Read a book in a format that you don’t normally read for fun. This might be a chapter book, a graphic novel, a book in verse, a picture book, or a hybrid book.

What Do You Plan to Read?

**Returning Students: What Do You Plan to Read? (Survey)**

You're not stuck with this choice, but we'd love to know what you think you might read. Please click on the survey link below (Thanks!!!)...

Theme-based Questions for Any Book on the Reading List

Guiding Questions for All Books

Consider these questions as you are reading your book. Having answers to them, with quotations from the book (cite the  page number) as supporting evidence will be very helpful when it is time to discuss and assess your reading.

For any Story / Essay / Story  in your book, consider the following questions

  •  What is the "Window" I am looking through? How are the characters' or writers' lives different from mine? 
    • How would I handle myself in a similar situation? Would I even find myself in that situation?
  •  Is this story a "Mirror" for me at all?   What can I see of myself in this story?

Identify one or two stories where a character makes an expression or demonstration of faith.

  • How does the character express or demonstrate their faith? 
  • What situation brought about that expression or demonstration?
  • How might the story differ if faith was not a part of the story?

Consider also:

  • Are there instances in any of the stories you read where a character questioned their faith?  
    • What led them to question their faith?
    • How do they question their faith? 
    • How might the story be different if the character was firm in their faith?
    • If given the chance, what would you say to that character to help them come to a better understanding of their faith?
  • Are there any stories where faith does not play a part where a character's choices/actions/situation might have turned out differently if they demonstrated faith?

 

Identify at least two stories where a character demonstrates honesty.

  • With whom does the character need to be honest?  (this could be themself). 
  • How is their honesty received?  What are the results?
  • How might the story differ if the character chose not to be honest?

Consider also:

  • Are there instances in any of the stories you read where a character chose not to demonstrate honesty?  
    • Why did they make that choice?
    • What were the effects of that choice?
    • How might the story differ if the character chose to be honest instead?

Identify at least two stories where a character demonstrates courage.

  • How does the character demonstrate courage?
  • What situation prompts the character to demonstrate courage?
  • What are the results of their courage?
  • How might the story differ if the character was not courageous?

Consider also:

  • Are there instances in any of the stories you read where a character was unable to demonstrate courage when presented with an opportunity?  
    • Why did they make that choice?
    • What were the effects of that choice?
    • How might the story differ if the character was courageous instead?

 

Identify at least two stories where a character acts responsibility.

  • How does the character act responsibly?. 
  • What situation requires the character to act responsibly?
  • What are the results of their action?
  • How might the story differ if the character acted irresponsibly in the situation instead ?

Consider also:

  • Are there instances in any of the stories you read where a character acted irresponsibly?  
    • Why did they make that choice?
    • What were the effects of that choice?
    • How might the story differ if the character acted responsibly instead?